#KU Researcher Documents Gender, Class Bias in Quarantine Law Measures, 1917-1942

Reprinted from today’s KU Today:

LAWRENCE — As the World War I military draft brought to the forefront the high rate of venereal disease among the civilian population, states began to enact measures to quarantine people and begin forms of treatment to try to control syphilis, gonorrhea and other potential outbreaks. However, a University of Kansas researcher has documented examples of how this process continued well into peacetime and how these laws were generally enforced along lines of gender and class, especially punishing poor women. Nicole Perry, a University of Kansas graduate student in sociology, studied Chapter 205, the state of Kansas quarantine law that took effect in 1917 and led to approximately 5,000 women being imprisoned at the Women’s Industrial Farm in Lansing between 1917 and 1942.

Click here to read the full article.

#KU and #WWI Commemoration

One of the ongoing themes of this season’s Downtown Abbey has been how to commemorate and memorialize casualties from World War I. Should there be a stone commemorating the dead in the city square? A park where villagers can sit and quietly reflect? When we have experienced so much loss, how is it that we’ll best remember? After WWI, this commemorative soul searching occurred in almost every community and town around the world — even right here at home at the University of Kansas.

On January 9th, 2015, the Lawrence Journal World‘s Sara Shepherd interviewed William Towns, former union operations manager and KU history scholar, about KU’s Memorial Stadium and Student Union, commemorative WWI buildings on the KU campus. In the article we learn how decisions made about WWI commemoration affected decisions regarding WWII memorials and the construction of our much-recognized Campanile.

Read the article.

KU History website.

A global guide to the first world war – interactive documentary

Have you seen The Guardian‘s amazing interactive guide to the first world war? It’s worth checking out!

Ten historians from 10 countries give a brief history of the first world war through a global lens. Using original news reports, interactive maps and rarely-seen footage, including extraordinary scenes of troops crossing Mesopotamia on camels and Italian soldiers fighting high up in the Alps, the half-hour film explores the war and its effects from many different perspectives. You can watch the documentary in English, French, German, Italian, Spanish, Arabic or Hindi thanks to our partnership with the British Academy.
The Guardian, July 23, 2014

Click here to access the Interactive Guide to WWI

Series of #KU events to honor #WW1, today’s veterans, military

On September 29th, KU Today published a fantastic write-up of KU WWI Centennial Commemoration events for 2014-15. Read the article here.

EXHIBITS

Now – Oct. 16
Local Veterans Art Exhibit
In connection with the performance “Basetrack,” the Lied Center will display the artwork of local veterans throughout the building.

Now – Oct. 16
KU Student Veterans Uniform Project
The contemporary uniforms from students who are serving or have served in the military will be on display. Location: Lied Center

Now – Winter 2014/2015
The Second Battlefield: Nurses in the First World Wardonations accepted
Works on paper reveal World War I’s second battlefield, the medical personnel caring for the wounded. As medical practices evolved during the war years, nursing played a critical role. Location: Spencer Museum of Art

Now – Winter 2014/2015
World War I and the End of Empires, donations accepted
The first public exhibit that pulls from a gift of more than 3,000 World War I art works, the exhibit explores how the Great War changed the notion of modernity and realigned the political map in ways that continue to affect us today. Location: Spencer Museum of Art

Now – Jan. 24
Doing Our Part: Lawrence During the Great War, donations accepted
Through letters, artifacts and photographs, the exhibit shares the stories of the men who served overseas, life on the homefront in Douglas County and local memorials honoring those lost in conflict. Location: Watkins Museum, 1047 Massachusetts St.

EVENTS

Tuesday, Sept. 30
The Elgar Concerto Within the Context of WWI6:30 p.m.
A pre-performance conversation will explore the Elgar Cello Concerto within the context of World War I. The presentation also will cover information about the recently acquired World War I art collection at the Spencer museum and KU’s World War I commemoration efforts. Location: Lied Center Pavilion

Tuesday, Sept. 30
University of Kansas Symphony Orchestra with Joshua Roman, 7:30 p.m.,
$20-$30 Adult / $11-$16 Student/Youth
The KU Symphony Orchestra will perform the Elgar Cello Concerto with guest cellist Joshua Roman. Written in the aftermath of World War I, the Elgar concerto expresses the composer’s sadness at the devastation of the war. Location: Lied Center

Wednesday, Oct. 8
Reading: The Poetry of the First World War, 4 p.m.
An Iraq and Afghanistan war veteran, Folleh Tamba created artwork inspired by World War I poetry. Tamba and KU students will read and discuss these poems. In October, Tamba’s exhibit, “A Grunt’s War Diary,” will be on view at Kansas State University. Location: Spencer museum

Monday, Oct. 13
Panel Discussion – Media and Military: A Tentative Alliance, 5:30 p.m.
Modern warfare relies on a relationship between the military and media, both of which seek to serve the public. This panel discussion will focus on this sometimes difficult and definitely complex relationship. Panelists will include: cast members of “Basetrack”; Barbara Bennett, associate dean of KU’s William Allen White School of Journalism & Mass Communications; and Mike Denning, director of the Office of Graduate Military Programs. Following the panel discussion a reception will be held for the cast of “Basetrack” at the VFW. Location: Watkins Museum, 1047 Massachusetts St.

Wednesday, Oct. 15
“Basetrack”; 7:30 p.m., $20-$30 Adult / $11-$16 Student/Youth
A multimedia theatrical performance, “Basetrack” draws on the power of soldiers’ stories to examine the experience of those who served in Afghanistan. The performance, which mixes live music, journalism and technology, sparks conversation on the legacy of war. Location: Lied Center

Tuesday, Oct. 21
Combat Veterans Courts: Leave No Veteran Behind, 7 p.m.
Part of a conference sponsored by Graduate Military Programs, the program will examine the national response to the plight of veterans within the criminal justice system. Melissa Fitzgerald, best known for her role as Carol on the television show “The West Wing” and currently senior director for Justice for Veterans, will headline the conference. Graduate Military Programs, the Command and General Staff College Foundation and Marine Corps University Foundation are hosting the program. Location: Woodruff Auditorium, Kansas Union

Wednesday, Oct. 22
War Termination – Compare and Contrast Vietnam to Afghanistan and Iraq, 7 p.m.
Graduate Military Programs, the Command and General Staff College Foundation and Marine Corps University Foundation are hosting the event. Location: Dole Institute of Politics

Tuesday, Nov. 4
Veterans Day Run

Saturday, Nov. 8
Salute to Service at KU football game

Tuesday, Nov. 11
Vigil.

Bruce Menning #WW1 lecture available online

Did you miss the Tuesday, September 9th CREES Brownbag lecture with military historian Bruce Menning on “Russia and the Outbreak of the Great War”? No problem! A video of the lecture is available on the CREES YouTube channel!

 

Upcoming #KU lecture on Russia and #WWI

The KU Center for Russian, East European & Eurasian Studies is proud to present Military Historian Professor Bruce W. Menning for a CREES brownbag lecture on “Russia and the Outbreak of the Great War.”

Professor Menning is the well known author and editor of:
Bayonets Before Bullets: The Imperial Russian Army, 1861-1914
Reforming the Tsar’s Army: Military Innovation in Imperial
Russia from Peter the Great to the Revolution
World War Zero: The Russo-Japanese War in Global Context

The lecture will take place on Tuesday, September 9th at 12pm in 318 Bailey Hall on the University of Kansas campus. The event is free and open to the public.

BB_Great War Flier (2)

Peggy Hull Deull, America’s first female war correspondent

There’s a new post on the University of Kansas Kenneth Spencer Research Library‘s blog about a 2014 Summer Conservation Intern’s experience working on items related to Peggy Hull Deull, America’s first female war correspondent.

Born in 1889 in Bennington, KS, Peggy Hull Deull was inspired to become a journalist during the First World War. As a war correspondent, she traveled from the US to Mexico, Paris, London, Siberia, and Shanghai. 

Peggy Hull [Deuell] in WWI uniform, 1917. Kansas Collection, Call Number RH MS 130.

Peggy Hull [Deuell] in WWI uniform, 1917. Kansas Collection, Call Number RH MS 130.

“Peggy’s collection is also one of the many fantastic features that facilitates our study of war history, and in particular, helps to commemorate the 100th anniversary of World War I,” said Amber Van Wychen, 2014 Summer Conservation Intern.

To read Amber’s full post, go to: http://blogs.lib.ku.edu/spencer/peggy-hull-deuell-a-conservation-internship/

#KU_WWI Sentiments: the Good, the Bad & the Retweeted

When it comes to using social media to explore historical topics, one is never quite sure how it’s going to turn out. The crowd sourcing aspect of Twitter is by nature unpredictable — and once it’s out on the internet, it’s out there for good.

It was just a few months ago that #KU_WWI staff sat down to talk about these issues. Our anxieties ranged from, “What if the technology doesn’t work?” to “What if we incite an international incident by inadvertently offending an eastern european country?” But our biggest concerns were, “Would anyone take notice?” and “Would they find it informative and useful?”

Rather than guess, we thought we’d just go ahead and ask.

Over the past few months we’ve been collecting your feedback into what we like to call, #Sentiments: The Good, The Bad & The Retweeted — thoughts and opinions from the twitterverse. And in this blog post, we thought we’d share a summary.

Read the complete archive of #KU_WWI Sentiments on Storify.

Almost from the beginning, the project had a faithful following who helped spread the word.

Your promotion caught the eye of local media and resulted in our first press coverage.

By the end of the project, we were featured on Kansas Public Radio’s KPR Presents, Channel6 News, and had been the subject of 18 online and print articles including in the Associated Press and The Washington Post.

The project reached a global audience who tweeted about #KU_WWI in multiple languages — Spanish, French, Bosnian, Serbian, Chinese, Russian and Czech.

As the LIVE Tweetenactment unfolded, quite a few of you stayed with us and watched as history happened as if LIVE on twitter.

That said, not everyone enjoyed the LIVE Tweetenactment. Negative feedback ranged from dubious to overtly offended by the project concept.

And a few good samaritans helped with grammar tips.

Some of your comments after the LIVE Tweetenactment were particularly poignant and insightful.

And by and large, your response to the #KU_WWI Twitter Project was overwhelmingly positive.

Preliminary reports indicate that the #KU_WWI Twitter Project had 456 contributors, generated 4,600 tweets, reached 623,900 unique twitter accounts, and created 3.4 million impressions throughout the entire twitterverse.

Thank you to everyone who made this project such a success!

The #KU_WWI Twitter Project is a collaboration among the Center for Russian, East European & Eurasian Studies, the Ermal Garinger Academic Resource Center, European Studies Program, the departments of Germanic Languages & Literatures, History and Slavic Languages & Literatures, University Honors Program, Global Awareness Program, Hall Center for the Humanities, KU Libraries, KU Memorial Unions and Spencer Museum of Art. This project is also sponsored by the National World War I Museum at Liberty Memorial in Kansas City.

The University of Kansas Center for Russian, East European & Eurasian Studies is designated a Title VI National Resource Center for the study of Russia, Eastern Europe and Eurasia by the U.S. Department of Education.

This project is part of the University of Kansas centennial commemoration of World War I, coordinated by the European Studies Program. Learn more about participating units and upcoming programs at KUWWI.com.

#KU_WWI @GSoldierSvejk Literary Tweetenactment

Since 1923, The Fateful Adventures of The Good Soldier Švejk during the World War, or more commonly known as The Good Soldier Švejk, has been delighting audiences around the world with its dark comedy and biting anti-war themes.

 

Considered the grandfather of satirical anti-war novels like Catch-22, The Good Soldier Švejk is a hilarious yet scathing commentary on the ludicrous absurdity of 20th century Austro-Hungarian bureaucracy. The novel has been translated into over 58 languages and many acknowledge it as one of the greatest masterpieces of satirical writing ever written.

 

For the purposes of the #KU_WWI Twitter Project, we present an abbreviated first chapter of The Good Soldier Švejk in which Švejk (@GSoldierSvejk) learns about the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand (@ArchdukeFranzi) from his cleaning lady, Mrs. Müller (@CharwomanMuller). What is striking about their discussion is its seeming irrelevance to their everyday lives — they are interested in the event, but only in so much as people are when it comes to royalty and scandal.

 

The literary tweetenactment tries to be as true to the English translation of the novel as possible, with abbreviation and some artistic license for the 140-character tweet limitation.

Read the @GSoldierSvejk Tweetenactment here.

The @GoodSoldierSvejk Tweetenactment is meant to represent the greater body of WWI literature, music, and art that would come out of the early part of the 20th century. It is our opinion that history is best understood by exposure to the humanities, and it is our hope that you will be inspired to seek your own copy of The Good Soldier Švejk as a means of better understanding the First World War.

Click here to learn more about the #KU_WWI Twitter Project.

Did you know that the Spencer Museum of Art at the University of Kansas now hosts one of the largest collection of WWI art in the United States? Click here to read an article about the collection.